The Anatomy of a Successful Email

Category: Marketing Dilemmas

success-kid

25% Open Rate
35% Click-Through-Rate

As you know, writing successful emails can be tricky.

How pushy should you be? What is the right message you should use to reach your audience? How long should it be?

These are all legitimate questions that can drive the average marketer up the wall. Recently, we wrote an email to our users that evoked a massive response. To help you market your services more effectively, we want to share some of the successful content insights and tactics we found using our fanatically analytical approach.

By following these tactics, we saw a 4x increase in CTR from the previous email.

  1. Short is Sweet: Get to the point in a friendly yet simple way. No fluff, no sales talk…just facts. Our entire email was only 57 words compared to the average email of 94 words.
  2. 2 Bulleted Call-to-Actions: Rather than having call-to-actions that are large and duplicated throughout, we had 2 CTAs in bullet format. That’s it, just 2.
  3. The Power of Instantly and Free: Using key words like instantly, now, free, your etc. are great ways to highlight your offer and connect with your audience.
  4. It’s All About YOU: Make it all about your audience. Rather than saying here is what we have, write the content from the perspective of the end user. Here’s what YOU can do to fix your site.
  5. Start With a Great Fact: Start off your email right away with an indisputable fact related to their business. An example of this would be “Did you know Google changed the layout of their ads 20 times last month? When was the last time you checked your ads?” This tactic scares the user and provokes an emotional response for them to fix it!
  6. People Love Personal: Finally, use a personal tone and personal signature. People don’t like getting mass emails and like to feel it’s coming directly from a person, not a computer.

We are confident using these tactics will help you greatly improve your e-mail efforts. This way, when you’re drafting your next email, you won’t have to keep writing it over and over. Or at least you’ll only have to write 50-60 words over and over. :)

NOTE: This test was performed on a subscriber base of 1,300 readers over three email submissions.

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